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Great job. I was amazed at the cabling job-I could not find them and was told to look up in the upper portion of the canopy and there they were. Very impressed. ” - John S.

What should a tree planting hole look like?

There is the right way to plant a tree and the wrong way. Unfortunately, many trees in the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex are planted improperly, which sets them up for a host of problems down the road. Planting a tree too low, then piling soil and mulch up around the base of the tree trunk will only lead to eventual disappointment. We all have goals when planting a new tree; be it to shade a patio, cut energy costs in our home or add visual features and focal points to our landscape. We all want our new trees to thrive and reach maturity with vigor.

No one plants a tree hoping they'll have to replace it three years later. Getting a free tree replacement isn't really "free" when you have to start all over again with a new tree specimen. While trees are living things, and there are many factors that can impact the success or failure of a tree to thrive along the way, we believe proper planting at the start will give your tree the best chance for long term success.

So what should that planting hole look like when your new tree is being installed? We thought we'd offer up some photos of one of our recent tree plantings so you can get a better idea of what to look for:

Tree Hole

  • You may notice this doesn't look like a traditional planting hole. But it is how there tree experts here at Preservation Tree will dig the hole for your new tree when we install it. Radial trenches around the planting hole allow for proper drainage of water away from the root ball.  You can click HERE for a visual diagram of our planting procedure.
  • When we insert the tree, you'll notice that we've not added any amendments, like compost, into the planting hole. This is not necessary or beneficial for your new tree.

  • You'll also notice that the hole is dug to a depth that allows the tree root ball to sit 2" above soil level...not below. We always make sure the base of the trunk and root flares are above the soil line.

  • Then, we backfill the planting hole and radial trenches with native soil. You'll notice that there is no soil or mulch piled against the base of the trunk, as this can lead to disease and decline of your newly planted tree. Mulch can be applied as a topdressing around the planting area, but never against the tree trunk.

If this is not how your new trees were planted, have us come take a look to see if we can correct any planting errors. We can also select and properly plant your new trees for you. Before you decide to have your yard maintenance crew take care of this critical planting service, call the tree experts at Preservation Tree!



Entry Info

Categories: Trees, Tree Planting
Tags: Tree Planting, Trees
Posted: February 18, 2013